Clark GCX50:
Mast cylinder rebuilding.

Does anyone have experience with rebuilding two smaller cylinders on mast?
What is best way to remove rams to rebuild?
Have rebuilt center cylinder already.
Does anyone have step procedures to get them out?
  • Posted 10 Feb 2021 00:45
  • Discussion started by tdarr
  • Florida, United States
tdarr@appi.us
Showing items 1 - 1 of 1 results.
Are you referring to the outer staging cylinders?

If so, you remove whatever retains the top of the rod in the mast. This can be a bolt or a snap ring. You then lower the forks completely to ensure there is no hydraulic pressure left in the cylinders. Raise the mast with straps and another forklift or an overhead crane. The outer cylinders should stay lowered. You then remove any cylinder restraints and the lower hydraulic hoses to the cylinders. Depending on mast design, you can either remove the cylinders out the top or angle them and slide them out the bottom. Be careful.
  • Posted 21 Feb 2021 06:28
  • Reply by PorkChop
  • Ontario, Canada

Post your Reply

Forkliftaction.com accepts no responsibility for forum content and requires forum participants to adhere to the rules. Click here for more information.

Having trouble using the Discussion Forums? Contact us for help.

Global Industry News
edition #1188 - 18 July 2024
All corners of the world are acknowledging the need to reduce greenhouse gases, as evidenced by this week’s news... Continue reading
Upcoming in the editorial calendar
DIGITISED STOCK CONTROL AND FORKLIFTS
May 2024
PRODUCTION OF MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT IN NORTH AMERICA
Aug 2024
Global Industry News
edition #1188 - 18 July 2024
All corners of the world are acknowledging the need to reduce greenhouse gases, as evidenced by this week’s news... Continue reading
Fact of the week
The Japanese word 'Irusu' means 'pretending not to be home when an unwanted visitor knocks at the door'.
SMV (Konecranes) 12-600B
Hornweg, Netherlands
Used - Sale
Mafi MT30TT
Balling, Denmark
Used - Sale
Fact of the week
The Japanese word 'Irusu' means 'pretending not to be home when an unwanted visitor knocks at the door'.