Discussion:
Forklift Access and Monitoring Systems

What are the most important features customers look for in implementing a forklift access and monitoring system? Is it speed control, impact, software features, installation or just cost?
  • Posted 1 Jan 2014 05:36
  • Discussion started by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
Showing items 1 - 15 of 50 results.
This monitoring system relates to a system and method for tracking, monitoring, and managing equipment in a business, college and universities level. This centralized system is used to control and assets of equipment, systems, and machines. It also easily give data that where is equipment located. It is the very powerful monitoring system. If you want to buy must check https://www.reecoupons.com
  • Posted 21 Jul 2018 22:13
  • Reply by sara_luck
  • United States
If anybody wants any accessories must go on https://www.reecoupons.com
Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses Rule-making.

The purpose of this rule-making is to improve workplace safety and health through the collection of useful, accessible, establishment-specific injury and illness data to which OSHA currently does not have direct, timely, and systematic access. With the information acquired through this proposed rule, employers, employees, employee representatives, the government, and researchers will be better able to identify and abate workplace hazards. OSHA is proposing to amend its record-keeping regulations to add requirements for the electronic submission of injury and illness information employers are already required to keep under Part 1904. The proposed rule amends 29 CFR 1904.41 to add three new electronic reporting requirements.

It's all about collecting the data to make improvements.

OSHA (US Department of Labor)
  • Posted 11 Jan 2014 01:10
  • Reply by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
One of the customers I look after specced a factory fitted optional safety package on there new fleet of reach trucks.

Then shortly after the new fleet was up & running they had 1 part of the system disabled as they didn't like the way it affected productivity.

They had a demo truck for a month with the exact same features on, why they never picked up on this before ordering a load of them I've no idea.
  • Posted 10 Jan 2014 01:13
  • Reply by Forkingabout
  • england, United Kingdom
Technology has it's place. It finds value only when coupled with operators who have been trained properly and the company leadership truly values safety. Too many times I've seen lazy, irresponsible management experience an accident and their first responses; "can't we limit the truck?" or "let's redesign the layout of the facility" or "let's add mirrors, lights, and technology". None of that will have a significant impact on the environment if proper training is not happening and management is actively demonstrating their desire that everyone go home every night and have supper with their families... and not ending up in the emergency room or worse... the morgue. You can't get that with technology alone.
  • Posted 10 Jan 2014 00:05
  • Reply by tjoldman
  • Ohio, United States
bbforks just about everything i quoted is public knowledge but i pulled that information off AisleCop's site. It is a very intuitive site on safety.
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 09:47
  • Reply by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
The reason for my last post was to show how subjective safety & such are. Everyone wants safety & cost reduction but at what price? The answer is- as cheaply as possible, don't affect production & don't make mangement responsible.

Gamechanger- you mention there are almost 900,000 forklifts in operation in the US- where did you get this information?
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 09:27
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
The Toyota Spot Me system is worth looking at, it can really help reduce the chance of collisions between forklift trucks & also collisions between forklift trucks & pedestrians.
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 04:28
  • Reply by Forkingabout
  • england, United Kingdom
Forklift accidents account for 61,800 minor injuries, 34,900 serious injuries, and 85 forklift related deaths every year, according to OSHA estimates. With almost 900,000 forklifts in operation at any given time in the Unites State, those numbers amount to a 1 in 10 chance that each forklift working in your facility will be involved in an accident this year. Thats not great odds for the safety record at your facility someone at your facility could be injured this year due to a forklift accident.

Forklift collisions account for about 46% of total forklift accidents including crush injuries where personnel are trapped between two forklifts, between a forklift and stationary surface, or where pedestrians are struck by a forklift. The numbers clearly show that the odds are against you unless you take action to mitigate those risks. We all know education is an important element in increasing safety, but it works only as well as the training done it and the attentiveness of both drivers and pedestrians. More must be done in key areas of collision prevention, traffic control and pedestrian safety measures in order to reduce your risks. Statement by AisleCop
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 04:23
  • Reply by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
well bbforks
thats what happens when you put bean counters in charge of these things. All they see is numbers going across thier desk and they have no real clue about their operations. And even though you had the numbers right there in front of you showing them you have to figure, you're just a technician trying to tell them about numbers and they don't want someone like you telling them how to run thier business. I run into this all the time myself too. To them i suppose it may be threatening or they look at you as a lower life form being a lift truck tech. I just don't know exactly what it is that makes them that way but it is annoying none the less ;o)
Maybe they need to take time to compare their data with yours to believe it.... shrugs
OR... maybe they need time to sort it out to make it look like they came up with these figures to make themselves look good instead of giving you the credit... which goes back to my original analogy above..... lower life form ;o)

In any case you can lead a horse to water but you cant make him drink nor swallow it soooooooo......

just tell them and let it go is all you can do i guess :o)
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 04:12
  • Reply by swoop223
  • North Carolina, United States
You've been swooped!
swoop223@gmail.com
I serviced a fleet for a major trucking company at one time & one of their old timers did- in fact- perform the pre-check before his shift like clock work. He liked "his lift" & didn't like using another when his was down.

I can tell you his repairs/downtime were the least of the fleet. I brought this to mangement's attention after finding out he was getting a hard time because he refused to do any moves with his lift before the pre-check was done.

Their answer was that the pre-check was just a formality & was "only really needed- like once a week". Even with the numbers in front of them, they still didn't see it's importance.

This is the same company which broke by b**** every time a lift went down, wanting to know cost & downtime- go figure.....
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 01:43
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
The cell phone, soda, coffee and cigarettes check list is almost all employees Pre-Op check. We are just trying to find a way to monitor it. LOL
  • Posted 8 Jan 2014 23:39
  • Reply by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
Yeah, I wish someone would send me a video of a forklift operator doing a bona fide preshift inspection of a forklift. I have never seen one.
The only preshift I ever see is the operator making sure they have their cell phone and soda/coffee/cigarettes on them.
(only slightly exaggerating here)
  • Posted 8 Jan 2014 15:14
  • Reply by L1ftmech
  • Tennessee, United States
Its very rare for me to see an operator actually carry out a pre shift check before using a forklift.

One customer I looked after in the past would send managers out in to the warehouse & stop random operators, ask to look at the pre shift check card & then the manager would check over / test the truck.

If something was found faulty by the manager that the operator had ticked ok to the operator then had some explaining to do as to why the truck hadn't been defected.
  • Posted 8 Jan 2014 05:07
  • Reply by Forkingabout
  • england, United Kingdom
Well, if the system is set up properly and has the capability, you can write the question so the operator has to read it and not just answer yes to everything. For example you might ask "Are the Breaks in non-working condition" and if he says yes the system shuts down. Also you can record the time it takes for the operator to conduct his pre-op check list and if if is done to fast it will show up in the report.
  • Posted 8 Jan 2014 04:38
  • Reply by GameChanger
  • Florida, United States
yes forkingabout having the buttons change around does make the operator have to think a bit more and actually read whats going on 'onscreen' but that still depends on if he's being honest when it comes to answering 'yes' or 'no' to anything.
He won't make that mistake but once before he figures out whats going on and learns to just hit 'yes' on every question.
;o) hehe... know what i mean?
  • Posted 8 Jan 2014 04:27
  • Modified 8 Jan 2014 04:29 by poster
  • Reply by swoop223
  • North Carolina, United States
You've been swooped!
swoop223@gmail.com

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