Discussion:
When is an attachment condiered an attachment?

What is an attachment? Is it a side shifter that is held onto the carriage with hold down clamps? Is it a lfiting platform or lifting boom that is not attached to the carriage but has fork pockets? Which can be considered attachemnts that must be shown on the fork lift data plate? And when are you required to show an attachment with derated capicties and load centers on the forklift data plate?
  • Posted 10 Aug 2011 08:32
  • Discussion started by cownd
  • Arizona, United States
orchidlane29@gmail.com
Showing items 1 - 13 of 13 results.
Thank you, this makes very good sense. Thanks for this quick answer!!!
  • Posted 13 Nov 2017 01:11
  • Reply by roger_c
  • New Brunswick, Canada
an attachment is any component/device not integrated into the design of the lift from the manufacturer.
now sideshifters used to be considered an attachment because they had to be installed on the carriage as a separate component and even to this day there are still 3rd party sideshifters that are considered attachments. If the sideshifter is integrated into the design of the lift bracket like alot are today it is not an attachment, it is considered part of the lift carriage/bracket assembly and part of the trucks mast assembly.

clamps, push-pull slipsheet, rotators, turn-a-fork devices, booms and components of that design would be considered attachments. And yes, "most attachments" do alter the capacity configuration of the lift so the lifts capacity data would have to be reconfigured and changed on the trucks dataplate to comply with manufacturer, ANSI and OSHA regulations.
Most baskets and platforms that are used in conjunction with the existing forks on the lift and are not installed permanently would not be considered an attachment and the dataplate would not have to be changed.

In most cases when the term 'attachment' is being used it generally refers to a device that is replacing the forks and is being used as a different method of manipulating or carrying the load/materials such as a bale clamp or rotating paper roll clamp or fork positioning sideshifter. (these are most common ones).
  • Posted 12 Nov 2017 14:29
  • Reply by swoop223
  • North Carolina, United States
You've been swooped!
swoop223@gmail.com
Is a cage that is used to transport gas bottle cylinders classified as an attachment on a lift truck. We have a forklift that transports gas cylinders around our work site. I thought it would be classified as an "attachment" but also see it being like a pallet just carrying a load. It is like a man lift cage that goes on a lift truck but the gate on the front locks and we can strap the bottles in the cage. There is also a ramp to easily slide the bottles on and off the cage. The trucks capacity does not get changed as the defined load center is unchanged. Looking for some clarification. Thanks
  • Posted 12 Nov 2017 11:29
  • Reply by roger_c
  • New Brunswick, Canada
We define attachment as any device mounted/installed on forklift that influences the rated capacity of the truck.

In other words - any device, because of which the defined load center is relocated, reducing the truck capacity (mainly because of stability issues) is considered as attachment.

That's why the long forks are not considered as attachment - the standard load center remains unchanged (f.e 500 mm from forks base) and for such application the trucks capacity remains unchanged
  • Posted 25 Jan 2012 03:33
  • Reply by Karait
  • Poland
I know your deepest secret fear...
J.M.
We define attachment as any device mounted/installed on forklift that influences the rated capacity of the truck.

In other words - any device, because of which the defined load center is relocated, reducing the truck capacity (mainly because of stability issues) is considered as attachment.

That's why the long forks are not considered as attachment - the standard load center remains unchanged (f.e 500 mm from forks base) and for such application the trucks capacity remains unchanged
  • Posted 25 Jan 2012 03:33
  • Reply by Karait
  • Poland
cownd -

Most forklifts have a three point suspension system and are very unstable and prone to tipping over. Most front end loaders have a four point suspension system and are much more stable.

Using the word tools in lieu of the word attachments will get you no where on modifications or additions to forklifts. A potential safety hazard by any name is still a potential safety hazard.

OSHA 1910.178(a)(4)

Modifications and additions which affect capacity and safe operation shall not be performed by the customer or user without manufacturers prior written approval. Capacity, operation, and maintenance instruction plates, tags, or decals shall be changed accordingly.

ANSI/ITSDF B56.1-2009

4.2.1 Except as provided in para. 4.2.2, no modifications or alterations to a powered industrial truck that may affect the capacity, stability, or safe operation of the truck shall be made without the prior written approval of the original truck manufacturer or its successor thereof. When the truck manufacturer or its successor approves a modification or alteration, appropriate changes shall be made to capacity plates, decals, tags, and operation and maintenance manuals.
  • Posted 19 Aug 2011 13:39
  • Modified 19 Aug 2011 13:44 by poster
  • Reply by joseph_h
  • Michigan, United States
johnr j -

Here is an ANSI/ITSDF interpretation:

Interpretation: 1-81
Subject: ANSI/ITSDF B56.1-2005, Section 7.5, Nameplates and Markings
Date Issued: December 15, 2006
Question (1): Are fork tines considered to be an attachment?
Answer (1): No. In Part IV, Glossary of Commonly Used Words and Phrases, the definition of attachment is given and states, in part, that an attachment is a device other than conventional forks.
Question (2): Is the length of the fork tines required to be annotated on the nameplate?
Answer (2): No, but as stated in section 7.27 each fork shall be clearly stamped with its individual load rating. Consult your operator manuals and ANSI/ITSDF B56.1 for additional instructions on capacity and handling loads properly.
  • Posted 19 Aug 2011 11:56
  • Reply by joseph_h
  • Michigan, United States
johnr j -

My interpretation of conventional forks would be forks with standard tips and tapers designed for pallet type use based on the forklift manufacturer's load ratings for a particular forklift.

The ANSI/ITSDF interpretation might be broader and include any type of fork which meets the forklift manufacturers load ratings for a particular forklift.
  • Posted 19 Aug 2011 03:13
  • Modified 19 Aug 2011 11:31 by poster
  • Reply by joseph_h
  • Michigan, United States
All good information and conversation but what is the official determination from OSHA? There seems to be a gray area when it comes to forklift attachments. Officially from OSHA what is a forklift attachment and when is it a requirement to have the forklift manufactures approval, and when is it a requirement to list that attachment on the capacity plate? Here's another way of thinking about, could fork extensions be considered a tool and not an attachment or are they the same such as, with a Caterpillar IT14G integral tool carrier wheel loader that can have a multitude of tools such as, bucket, forks, sweeper etc... These are considered a tool by Caterpillar and are not listed on the capacity plate. Why wouldn't it be requirement for this type of equipment it it's a requirement forklifts?
  • Posted 19 Aug 2011 00:12
  • Reply by cownd
  • Arizona, United States
orchidlane29@gmail.com
joesph,
How would one interpret the term "conventional" forks. The reason I ask, most lift truck manufacturers indicate there standard configurations is with 42" or 48" long forks. On rare occasions, lifts can be fitted with 84" - 96" long forks (say for truss handling). In most cases the lift capacity (typically a 15K pneumatic) is limited by the strength of the forks vs truck limitations.
  • Posted 18 Aug 2011 20:45
  • Reply by johnr_j
  • Georgia, United States
"Have An Exceptional Day!"
In reality the machines are "lift trucks" therefor a lift truck fitted with fork attachments becomes a "fork" lift truck, a clamp attachment makes it a clamp truck etc. Anything fitted to a lift truck for a specific lifting operation is an attachment.
For instance a popular misconception is to call a telescopic machine a telescopic fork lift, whereas its actually a TMH, Telescopic Materials Handler, fitted with any attachment for a specific lifting operation.
  • Posted 18 Aug 2011 18:58
  • Reply by MaxaM60
  • Bristol, United Kingdom
Instructor, ITSSAR Cat' 4 Tutor
Here is what @ToyotaEquipment tweeted as interesting fact related to data plates:
"I've seen multiple data plates mounted like a flip book on more than one truck"
Look for @ToyotaEquipment on Twitter.
  • Posted 10 Aug 2011 12:14
  • Reply by FLA_Forum
  • Queensland, Australia
cownd -

ANSI/ITSDF B56.1-2009, (Revision of ANSI/ITSDF B56.1-2005)
SAFETY STANDARD FOR LOW LIFT AND HIGH LIFT TRUCKS
Powered and Nonpowered Industrial Trucks
Part IV - Glossary of Commonly Used Words and Phrases

attachment: a device other than conventional forks or load
backrest extension, mounted permanently or removably
on the elevating mechanism of a truck for handling the
load. Popular types of fork extensions, clamps, rotating
devices, side shifters, load stabilizers, rams, and booms.

attachment, removable: an attachment that can be
mounted on the forks, or in place of the forks on the
carriage, by means of such conventional fasteners as bolts,
pins, etc., and that does not require the disassembly of any
other portion of the lifting system to install or remove.
  • Posted 10 Aug 2011 09:19
  • Modified 12 Aug 2011 09:48 by poster
  • Reply by joseph_h
  • Michigan, United States

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