Mitsubishi FBC25:
Counterweight

Can anyone tell me how to remove the counterweight?

Thanks,
Jim
  • Posted 3 Apr 2014 09:07
  • Discussion started by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
Showing items 1 - 15 of 28 results.
That is correct about the torque convertor mounting.
But the convertor also features a center pilot hub and bushing.
When you are separating the convertor from the flywheel, make absolutely certain the convertor is not "stuck" to the flywheel with rust. Because there is no relative motion between the flywheel and the convertor hub, it is not uncommon for a rust bond to form there.
Always try to sort of "spin" the convertor around a couple of revolutions by hand after you remove the last bolt that holds the convertor to the flywheel. Spinning it around like that helps to pulverize any rust that may be there.
  • Posted 17 Apr 2014 00:33
  • Reply by L1ftmech
  • Tennessee, United States
Yeah, I completely agree, no doubt that's what I'll do. Even with a sheet of luan plywood in between it wouldn't take much to damage it and clearances would be really tight. I expect a pulley or bolts would be the first thing to hit. (correct about the fan btw)

Looks like the torque converter has a mounting plate that bolts to the rim of the flywheel maybe. If that's correct it appears the engine only has to come forward a couple inches. Anybody know?

Jim
  • Posted 16 Apr 2014 23:42
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
I'm pretty certain the fan is on the backside of the radiator (enclosed within the counterweight with the hydraulic pump) on this model Mitsi.
But I'm in agreement about removing the radiator.
I mean, even if you knew you had exactly 1/4" clearance in which to slip the engine out after bringing it away from the trans, why risk holing a radiator?
I cases like this, moving an easily damaged component out of the way is good insurance, and usually the fastest and cheapest way to go.
I see/hear of people always talking it up about how something or the other does not have to be removed to do this or that.
But if you look at getting something completely out of any harm's way, that's often the best money making/saving route to take.
  • Posted 16 Apr 2014 22:53
  • Modified 16 Apr 2014 22:54 by poster
  • Reply by L1ftmech
  • Tennessee, United States
pulling the engine without pulling the radiator?
well....
i wouldn't advise that, not even sure its possible.
Once you get the engine loose from the tranny it has to be pulled back to clear the transmission case. I suppose if you removed the fan and alternator and fan shroud you MIGHT get enough clearance to get it out. But by the time you do all that you could have just pulled the radiator, its only 4 hoses, (5 if you include the reservoir hose), and a couple of bolts. All it would take is one wrong move and you got a hole in the radiator core, why take the risk? Just pull it. New radiators are 600 to 800 dollars and a new core is half of that plus the labor to replace it. Not worth the risk imo.
  • Posted 16 Apr 2014 20:51
  • Modified 16 Apr 2014 20:52 by poster
  • Reply by swoop223
  • North Carolina, United States
You've been swooped!
swoop223@gmail.com
Thanks guys. That info about the trunions was sort of what I expected from looking at it, but it might make the removal easier. Anybody ever remove one of these without taking out the radiator? Looks close but maybe possible. (Not that it'd necessarily be a good idea)
I got the numbers off the block. There's a serial number too. On that flat pad you mentioned, it's pretty obvious with the head off.

I'll try to pull the engine some time in the next few days, then worry about what to put back in. I do appreciate all the cautions and I agree. But it's sort of a case of either get the cheap engine and have a running forklift, with maybe a bit of extra work to do it, or wait a year or two since it isn't really a priority and then maybe just haul it off to the scrap yard instead of fixing it because it's in the way all the time. I'm sure you guys would rather see it fixed.

Jim
  • Posted 16 Apr 2014 14:55
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
Jim,
where did you get this info from? the prevous owner? or off the engine block itself?
Engine is a 4G52 #JW2735

if you look in the side of the block this info is stamped into it. Didn't see anyone mention this but there is a place about half way down the drivers side of the engine block that is a flat machined off square that has the engine model number stamped into it, maybe even the serial number too.
I'm assuming this is where you got those numbers from?

After looking up this truck by serial number you gave it could have either of these engines in it, one you mentioned
4G33, 4G52 or 4G54.
I would look on that place on the block and verify this.
As for putting an automotive engine in?
i would advise against this, not designed for forklift applications so it might be more trouble than it's worth.
  • Posted 14 Apr 2014 21:11
  • Modified 14 Apr 2014 21:18 by poster
  • Reply by swoop223
  • North Carolina, United States
You've been swooped!
swoop223@gmail.com
You WILL have to support the transmission BEFORE you separate the engine from it.
The engine, transmission and drive axle are bolted together as a unit but the drive axle housing is free to pivot because it is mounted in a trunnion yoke on the front end of the frame. If you don't support the trans, it is going to drop (pivot in frame) when the engine comes free.
As far as cushion mounts for the engine, those are basically to help minimize the chances of cracking the engine block due to stresses of frame flexing. Yes, the frame of a forklift actually flexes, no matter how stiff and rigid it looks or seems it ought to be.
  • Posted 14 Apr 2014 09:37
  • Modified 14 Apr 2014 14:38 by poster
  • Reply by L1ftmech
  • Tennessee, United States
Pressure washed the FL today and re-installed the counterweight. So the next thing will be to pull the block (head is already off). Looks pretty straightforward, I'm guessing the radiator comes out first. Pump drive looks easy enough, motor mounts are what I expected.

The only question I have is, do I need to support the bellhousing or is it fixed in position? Seems like if it is fixed it will be simpler, but if it is, why would they have used cushion mounts on the block?

Jim
  • Posted 14 Apr 2014 08:55
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
I am too, and I'll run a time ticket on the job so should be able to get pretty close on costs. Looking at online photos side bolt bosses seem to be pretty common and well laid out so the mounts may not even be an issue. The rear plate *may* need to be re-drilled but I sort of doubt it. The damper could be an issue for the hydraulic drive but hopefully they used the same crank. That leaves the compression ratio. Propane can commonly run 11:1 and maybe higher but I think the high compression car engine is about 9:1 but I don't know what they used in their forklift engines. The cams are probably different too. I'd think the forklift engine would emphasize torque but I'm willing to try it.

One other detail, is the jet valve common in car engines for emissions, but I don't think that will hurt anything as long as the rest of the engine is built for it. Might be a problem if swapping heads though.

Jim
  • Posted 6 Apr 2014 05:02
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
Since you're in the maching business it may be an viable option. If you do decide to attempt it, do me a favor & keep detailed notes on the time invested & any maching costs you may incur. Posting
your results in the end would be great help

I've run into problems installing a continental from a Clark into a Hyster & a slant 6 Chrysler 225 from a Dodge into a Yale forklift as well as others. The time & costs incurred negated any iniital price savings on the engine. I'm curious to see how you make out
  • Posted 6 Apr 2014 00:34
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
Thanks for your concern. Really. Most of what you say is correct. But there are a few things you are not aware of. Like I own a fabrication shop. Like I've been doing engine conversions of widely varying types for 30 years or more. So I'm completely familiar with what you are saying and see this as not that much of a challenge. Same engine family, the differences are likely to be minor. I'll have ample opportunity to compare bosses and pulleys and back-plates and such. Long as the plate bolts up to both blocks the bellhousing is no concern but the crank dampers will have to interchange for instance. The mounts... well, not that big of a deal really. And considering I can take a tank of compressed air to the P&P yard and run a leak down test before pulling the engine to make sure of getting a good one, I really don't see where this cost is going to come in. I mean, a guy in his 20's who could put a Datsun 1100 in a Cub Low Boy lawn tractor could surely put a Mitsubishi engine in a Mitsubishi forklift, wouldn't you say?

But for most, yeah. You are exactly right.
Jim
http://forum.britishv8.org/read.php?2,274,page=20
  • Posted 5 Apr 2014 14:26
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
You'll have real fun installing an automotive version of that engine into a forklift, anything is possible- the question is how much money do you want to spend in the hunt for trying to save money? Bellhousing bolts may not line up, crankshaft bolts may not line up, crankshaft pulley may have to be machined to fit, special motor mounts may need to be made,etc- but hey- at least you saved on the initial cost of the engine
  • Posted 5 Apr 2014 07:36
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
The serial number is: F82-53784
Engine is a 4G52 #JW2735

I got it home and unloaded, the head is off and it sat in the weather. I'll pressure wash it in a week or so and have a closer look. The right front wheel is stuck for some reason, brakes frozen maybe.

I got the full story on it today, the owner had the head rebuilt in Cincinnati by a supposedly reputable shop but it turned out that after bead blasting they did not clean the head before reassembling it. So it didn't last long. The owner tore it back down and saw the damage and bought another forklift. Lots of pieces missing, so a junkyard engine is a good idea just for the missing parts. If it turns out it will bolt up, why not? I haven't looked at the mounts but I'd guess the end plates should bolt to any 4G52 block. Guess I'll see when it comes out.

I could see the compression being different, for a propane engine. But the bottom line is I'm not going to put much money into it. I brought it home for less than scrap price so I can make money on it just hauling it off if it came to that. I don't think it will though.

Jim
  • Posted 5 Apr 2014 04:56
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States
I would not use a automotive engine. Bolt on parts and even your engine mounts may not fit. The heads on the larger 4G engines are different than automotive. I have heard many horror stories of people trying to get by cheap using a automotive engine and actually spending more in the long run. If you do a search for Mitsubishi forklift engines you will find several reputable rebuilder. These engines are very popular in the forklift industry so there are also a lot of cores out there if you plan on rebuilding one. A couple of companies that you might want to check with are Char-Nor, Grindstaff or Pioneer.
  • Posted 4 Apr 2014 13:19
  • Reply by Partsguy5
  • California, United States
OK that sounds good. I see from a search that those engines were common in a lot of Mitsu cars over the years so donors should be plentiful. I think the local pick-n-pull gets about $150. Wife had an Eclipse 1.5L, great engine. Shouldn't be too hard to put this back in service. I'll get the SN tomorrow.

Jim
  • Posted 4 Apr 2014 11:04
  • Reply by JimBlackwood
  • Kentucky, United States

Having trouble using the Discussion Forums? Contact us for help.

Forkliftaction.com accepts no responsibility for forum content and requires forum participants to adhere to the rules. Click here for more information.

FOR SALE ON MACHINERY-ONQ

BT RRE160WIDE-LEGS
United Kingdom
Netherlands
United Kingdom
Canada Ontario
Netherlands

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2021 - November 11, 2021 - Koln, Germany
February 22 - 24, 2022 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
April 23-27, 2022 - Orlando, Florida, United States

In the Discussion Forums

Movers & Shakers

president & CEO
Enerpac, United States
managing director, sales
Liebherr Container Cranes, Ireland
chief people officer
TVH, Belgium
head of operations
Walker Logistics, United Kingdom

FOR SALE ON MACHINERY-ONQ

Toyota 02-7FD45
Malaysia
China
Denmark
United Kingdom

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2021 - November 11, 2021 - Koln, Germany
February 22 - 24, 2022 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
April 23-27, 2022 - Orlando, Florida, United States

Movers & Shakers

president & CEO
Enerpac, United States
managing director, sales
Liebherr Container Cranes, Ireland
chief people officer
TVH, Belgium
head of operations
Walker Logistics, United Kingdom

FOR SALE ON MACHINERY-ONQ

SMV (Konecranes) 12-600B
United Kingdom
Denmark
United States Pennsylvania
Netherlands

Upcoming Events

November 10, 2021 - November 11, 2021 - Koln, Germany
February 22 - 24, 2022 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
April 23-27, 2022 - Orlando, Florida, United States

In the Discussion Forums

Movers & Shakers

president & CEO
Enerpac, United States
managing director, sales
Liebherr Container Cranes, Ireland
chief people officer
TVH, Belgium
head of operations
Walker Logistics, United Kingdom