Discussion:
Indystrial Machine

Which is the Best Industrial Machine You like ever...??
  • Posted 9 Jan 2014 19:32
  • Modified 9 Jan 2014 19:36 by poster
  • Discussion started by shah_h
  • ahmedabad
[URL=http://www.cranoistengineers.com/service.html]material handling equipment[/URL]
Showing items 1 - 13 of 13 results.
The model 20 Raymond series
  • Posted 9 Apr 2014 21:47
  • Reply by triumphrider
  • Texas, United States
I think the Linde H45D, 352 series diesel truck is the longest lasting, bullet proof truck with the lowest maintenance. We have customers that have put up to 40,000 hours on these trucks with rebuilding the engine or touching the hydrostatic drive. The radiators were solid aluminum and the steer axles were massive. You can drive one of these trucks that may have 20,000 hours on it and you would swear it only had 2000 hours. The only issue was that they ran so cool in colder climates the cab heater didn't put out enough heat.
Super quiet, super smooth and ultra dependable!
  • Posted 5 Apr 2014 23:43
  • Reply by duodeluxe
  • United States
duodeluxe
I am from the way back but, the machine for me is the H/S50XL Hyster with a "C" prefix in the serial number. They repaired all of the flaws between the "A" and "B" models and hit a home run with the "C". They were available with the Isuzu (diesel), Mazda or GM power plants (the Mazda being more durable with less problems). The transmission was simple, the cast steer axle was heavy duty and the drive axle was bulletproof. The unit was not without flaws though. #1 The engine harness main connector would fail yearly and need replacement, #2 The tilt cylinder shells would crack at the rear weld #3 The Transmission control valve leaked (repaired by doubling gasket) and #4 The upright tilt bushings would only last about 3000 hours. All around a great machine. In my opinion, a far cry from the over engineered units we have today. Sometimes more is not really better.
  • Posted 5 Apr 2014 07:49
  • Reply by OldSkool
  • South Carolina, United States
@bbforks, agree but with two open end wrenches I could have the "equalizer" out in a few minutes...and get some never-sieze inside.
  • Posted 2 Apr 2014 14:14
  • Reply by HerbTarlek
  • Minnesota, United States
As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.
I got a customer with a Yale G51P040, big pneumatic tires, Chrysler flat head 6, 2 speed F & R stick shift, dry clutch, AND a torque converter. She is a sweet ride.
  • Posted 2 Apr 2014 10:25
  • Reply by mrfixit
  • New York, United States
I agree the F02 series was good- but you have to admit that parking brake cable system they had was pretty terrible
  • Posted 2 Apr 2014 08:49
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
Early 1980's Datsun FO2 series, tractor simple and almost idiot proof..the QFO2 had SD22 diesel engines = easily 30000 hours
  • Posted 2 Apr 2014 05:27
  • Reply by HerbTarlek
  • Minnesota, United States
As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.
Ah- the last great forklift Clark made (IMHO). The truck that lasted forever & parts were easy to get. Not my favorite to service though- very tight working conditions & if leaks bothered you- this truck wasn't for you.

The best all around lift IMHO was the 3 series Toyotas with the 5R engines. Easy to work on, parts availability was good & pretty darn good put together truck. Never had many problems servicing these- pretty basic truck.

If it had a fault it was that it was maybe too basic- the newer Toyotas had bells & whistles that attracted buyers. Such a shame these trucks went away.
  • Posted 14 Jan 2014 09:35
  • Reply by bbforks
  • Pennsylvania, United States
bbforks (at) Hotmail (dot) com
Customers love technology- until they have to pay to fix it!
The C500's were never accused of being oversimplified for sure! Between two master cylinders, sequencing valves and inching slave cylinders- I could never remember if the inching or was it the brake master cylinder pushrod that needed residual pressure. Course the HydraTork had real steel for piston pack and shaft seals. Then there's the Chevron pack approach to sealing a tilt cylinder rod. Who thought of that? Not to leave out the steering cylinder! But- in their day, IMHO, they owned the market till the Toyotas and Nissans started shipping in.
  • Posted 12 Jan 2014 12:13
  • Reply by Forkliftt
  • Louisiana, United States
Steve
steve at forkliftt dot com
I would almost agree with c500s, and know of 1 company that removed the inching master cylinders when they were new, not because they knew the inch valve would leak in to the transmission, but because they didn't want inching. in 2001, they still had 50 units running 3 shifts. they gave the forklift repair shop foreman a company Cadillac Eldorado, for having saved so much over the years by not needing to replace their fleet.
  • Posted 12 Jan 2014 11:38
  • Reply by edward_t
  • South Carolina, United States
"it's not rocket surgery"
Clark C500y50
  • Posted 12 Jan 2014 10:49
  • Reply by Forkliftt
  • Louisiana, United States
Steve
steve at forkliftt dot com
I am big on considering an Archimedean screw as the best industrial machine i have ever seen...
but a fulcrum and lever would be what I expect to be highest rated in a group of folks devoted to forklifts.

they both "stand the test of time" too...
;-)
  • Posted 12 Jan 2014 05:09
  • Modified 12 Jan 2014 05:11 by poster
  • Reply by edward_t
  • South Carolina, United States
"it's not rocket surgery"
Clarklift C40B. Regards Skizziks
  • Posted 12 Jan 2014 04:03
  • Reply by Skizziks
  • Kentucky, United States

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