Discussion:
Bulldozing and pushing loads

Hi etharp

See my comments under "Using forklifts to push cargo" under "Safety, training & legislation" THe technical issues are given some detail and after reading those you may want to ask further questions.
  • Posted 31 Jan 2008 22:21
  • Discussion started by John_Lambert
  • Victoria, Australia
Better to strive and experience all life's colours from pain to ecstasy than to exist in a grey life
Showing items 1 - 15 of 16 results.
To johnr's point, there is a lack of control of the part of the load not on the blades.
I have a vivid recollection of a newbie pushing a 10 foot 6"x6" across the floor with the blade tip, it caught an expansion joint in the floor and took out the corner of a column and about 8 feet of drywall and corner bead.
After 25 years I still refer to that column at the convention center, as mine.
  • Posted 10 Sep 2009 04:41
  • Reply by TradeShowDave
  • California, United States
Ed T,

Also, look at it a bit from a safety stand point., a load(s) being pushed across the floor is just one expansion joint, building support column, up heaved concrete section from being out of control or creating a sudden stop of a 10,00 lb vehicle. Especially if the loads are on those "high" quality pallets from certain countries west of the US coast line.

Another structural issue is the impact forces on the carriage rollers & inner channel mast rails.

If the forklift was designed to push loads they may have been called "nudgers" first.
  • Posted 9 Sep 2009 22:11
  • Reply by johnr_j
  • Georgia, United States
"Have An Exceptional Day!"
Guys

the JCB Teletruk has no problems in pushing as well as lifting, as its telescopic arm offers excellent structural strength, much like a battering ram.
  • Posted 8 Sep 2009 22:40
  • Reply by linesman
  • Staffordshire, United Kingdom
Guys should anybody be interested we manufacture a product which specifically tackles the problem of "bull dozing" simply put the machine cant do it anymore. you can research it on our website www(dot)fmstech(dot)co(dot)za or email me richard(at)fmstech(dot)co(dot)za for more info the unit is called the TXP
  • Posted 8 Sep 2009 20:05
  • Reply by FMSRICH
  • kwazulu natal, South Africa
Re split forking

Forks are NOT designed for the loads implicit in this practice - all design loads and testing under USA, Australian or ISO standards are vertical and at the rated distance. Split forking imposes horizontal and torsional loads for whigh the forks were never designed.

In addition the carriage connection points are only designed for vertical loads on the forks.

Finally fork positioning systems are designed purely for that function - positioning a fork which has no load applied to it. They are not designed as a clamping mechanism.

Put simply the use of forklift trucks for split forking is abuse of the equipment; is likely to lead to premature failure of forks and or the carriage; and would be justification for voiding any warranty claim associated with the forks and carriage.
  • Posted 14 Mar 2008 07:25
  • Reply by John_Lambert
  • Victoria, Australia
Better to strive and experience all life's colours from pain to ecstasy than to exist in a grey life
Joseph,

You are the man, as I was reading along was thinking what you put down. OSHA directly addresses this issue:

Taken from OSHA letter of interpretation:

You explain that "split-forking" is when the operator moves two palletized loads by inserting one fork in each pallet. On trucks with hydraulically adjustable forks, the operator may then bring the forks as close to each other as possible, clamping the pallets together, prior to lifting and transporting the palletized loads. Alternatively, with hydraulically adjustable forks or not, the operator may just push the split-forked pallets across the floor.

When bulldozing, the operator would have one pallet on the forks, then use that load to push other pallets out ahead of the truck. Bulldozing may involve having two pallets arranged vertically on the forks (provided the height is not so tall as to obstruct vision), plus pushing up to six pallets (single or double stacked) out in front of the truck.

You specifically ask two questions:

Q. #1. Does OSHA consider these practices [to] violate §1910.178(o)(1), which states only stable or safely arranged loads shall be handled?

Response: Certainly, if the loads that are being split-forked or bulldozed result in a hazardous condition because they are not stable or safely arranged, there would be a violation of §1910.178(o)(1). Conversely, if these work practices are done safely, there would be no violation.

These two work practices, however, are potentially hazardous for the forklift drivers and for any pedestrians who may be in the area. The forklifts also are probably not designed to be used to lift and move loads in the split-forking or bulldozing manner you described. In addition, §1910.178(l)(3)(i)(M) requires that employees receive training on any operating instructions, warnings, or precautions listed in the operator's manual. If the truck's manual has warnings against these types of practices then this must be included in the training program content.

Loads that are lifted and/or pushed by split-forking or bulldozing can cause hazards in several ways, including: (1) compromising the forklift's capacity; (2) damaging the forks; (3) damaging the floor; (4) causing the load, or part of the load, to tip; (5) interfering with the maneuverability of the forklift; and (6) causing the driver less control of the loads during turns and stopping. As applied to a particular workplace, these practices may produce additional hazards, depending upon the specific workplace conditions such as: weather, lighting, space restraints, training, supervision, truck maintenance, and the job production schedule.

Q. #2. If not, would OSHA consider these practices to violate Section 5(a)(1) of the OSH Act? In other words, would OSHA issue a citation for violating Section 5(a)(1) to an employer for permitting these practices?

Response: Although OSHA does not have any specific regulations addressing these work practices, §1910.178 would probably apply. Certainly if the load was unstable or not safely arranged there would be a violation of 1910.178 (o)(1).

An employer has general responsibilities, delineated under Section 5(a)(1) of the OSH Act, to furnish to each employee a workplace free from recognized hazards that are causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm. OSHA can use the General Duty Clause only if an OSHA standard does not apply.
  • Posted 14 Mar 2008 04:57
  • Reply by Panthertrainer
  • Ohio, United States
I would think that pushing rows of pallets would be a TAD unsafe , how can you see what it is in front of the farthest pallet. If they are unwilling to change their material handling practices, then they will keep you busy with repairs and make your company money and have down time. I would say they have a "false" sense of productivity ,slamming and pushing is not a good way to move things. If they are making or exeeding production quotas but are paying out their profits for repairs, what have they gained? ---But the primary concern of these practices is the SAFTEY issue, I have seen the bottm hook on forks "peeled" off, sideshifts slung out in the floor and the list goes on, but how someone kept from getting hurt is beyond me. It has always amazed me why it is that someone has to get seriously injured or permanantly disabled or killed before some person in management looks and realizes "Reckon we ought not do things this way" Just a thought.
  • Posted 15 Feb 2008 11:49
  • Modified 14 Mar 2008 15:02 by poster
  • Reply by roadrat
  • North Carolina, United States
"ARE WE HAVING FUN YET?"
To read the OSHA standard interpretation on this subject,
Google: 11/02/1999 - Powered industrial truck requirements regarding split-forking and bulldozing.
  • Posted 11 Feb 2008 14:33
  • Reply by joseph_h
  • Michigan, United States
Ed I will email you the link.
  • Posted 11 Feb 2008 12:11
  • Reply by Drlifttruck
  • Texas, United States
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=22809

There is your response from OSHA.

Vague as usual.

My opine is it is a Fork LIFT Truck Not a Fork Push Truck.

However abuse is abuse adn not a design flaw.


Regards...
  • Posted 11 Feb 2008 12:11
  • Reply by Drlifttruck
  • Texas, United States
Lift Trucks all the same, just painted different colors.
Doc
Email: kulsh@forkliftservice.net
What about the operator's manual? In the electric world the operators manual for some manufacturers states "DO NOT PUSH LOADS". Maybe you can get a factory rep to get you some hard core information stating not to push loads and the damage it causes to the truck. Make sure if you're the tech doing all the maintenance you document in writing every time you told the operator or supervisor that pushing loads can cause damage to the equipment and possibly hurt someone. The operator does not have control of a load that is not on the forks. There may also be an OSHA document that supports not pushing loads. For warranty if the truck is new it may void warranty on the drive train. For a truck out of warranty new replacement parts may have their warranty voided if the factory finds out the customer has a history of pushing loads. Trust me I have denied them. Problem with IC trucks is they tend to be tuff and can take a ton of abuse.
  • Posted 5 Feb 2008 14:35
  • Reply by lifterman
  • Iowa, United States
Offer your customer a Linde lifttruck (hydrostatic drive)
  • Posted 1 Feb 2008 15:39
  • Reply by Av_Joe
  • South Carolina, United States
Once you realize that to an operator, a forklift is simply a 7,000lb hammer, you'll be much happier :-)

The customer will pay you to fix it, right scott?
  • Posted 1 Feb 2008 07:40
  • Reply by mike_n
  • Alberta, Canada
show your customer some invoice examples of transmission and diff rebuilds due to shunting. and show him the price of a new controller or drive motor repair. money usually gets there attention
  • Posted 1 Feb 2008 07:05
  • Reply by kevin_k
  • dumfriesshire, United Kingdom
Unreal how some people have no idea (LIFT) truck and fork(LIFT) should be enough no matter what we as industry people say to some of these people they will always be ignorant.
  • Posted 1 Feb 2008 06:08
  • Reply by PR2005
  • Illinois, United States

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