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DISCUSSION FORUMS : Forkliftaction.communicate
Forum: Virtual Coffee Shop: Industry Perspectives
Discussion:  Hazards, Incidents and Accidents
Number of messages: 19

START MESSAGE:
Admin
Australia
• Welcome this is the “Figures Corner”, you are now sipping coffee with thought leaders, from around the world, who wish to discuss the actual facts and figures …the question on the table is “What are the actual money term costs of incidents and accidents in the worklplace? What are the costs of losses caused by incidents, accidents and accidental damage? How big is the human cost? What is the workplace physical and financial cost? How many people are killed annually? How many are maimed for life? How much production downtime is lost? What is the product loss? What is the bottom line financially?
Can you help with figures from your country?


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Modified 15 Mar 2017 01:00 PM
by poster.
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Maton
Michigan, United States
The official OSHA website www.osha.gov gives figures up to 2015 for USA at https://stats.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0014.pdf
I cant see any forklift type figures so can someone lead us to anything that has a breakdown that is Forklift related ?


Modified 11 Feb 2017 09:53 AM
by administrator.
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Hunter
Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
Some regional governments such as British Columbia's Safety Council may have local stats. Perhaps someone could canvas possible sources of information and come up with averages. Maybe most Western countries already have statistics as suggested by Maton.

Posted 2 Feb 2017 11:17 PM Reply  Report this message
graham_h
Fife, United Kingdom
There was an interesting article by the AITT in the latest SHD Logistics magazine - See here to read it all.

A couple of stats/quotes that jumped out at me were:

"Forklift damage is another large contributor to unnecessary costs. It is estimated that truck damage can add as much as 5% to the cost of a standard lease. Across a fleet of trucks you're looking at many thousands of pounds of largely unnecessary costs per year."

"One major supermarket chain spends £3m each year on replacing damaged racking alone. Even a modest improvement to their operationwould amount to significant savings".

As a company that provides tagging and checklist systems to help reduce these risks we receive consistant feedback from customers advising us that their small investment has given them significant savings by spotting faults before they develop into something more serious. It's pretty evident that prevention is the key.

According to the HSE approximately 2,000 accidents and 10 fatalities are reported each year as a result of forklift operation in the United Kingdom. That's around 40 major injuries each week.

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Follow me on Twitter @goodtogosafety

Modified 11 Feb 2017 09:52 AM
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graham_h
Fife, United Kingdom
This incident also springs to mind as a 'worst case' scenario. We're still waiting for the official report but I suspect that a forklift collision would be the main contributory factor? If you consider the effects of an incident like this then the costs of an accident will be significant - in this case it will relate not only to forklift costs but stock, replacement racking, the cost to rent new premises during repairs, the knock on costs  on reputation, delayed deliveries, loss of business etc. Something like this would be enough to tip a lot of SMEs over the edge and out of business. link to the article

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Follow me on Twitter @goodtogosafety

Modified 11 Feb 2017 09:55 AM
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bwsisi
Pennsylvania, United States
What I have is from 2011 and it is cost based on unintentional injuries at work. It is $188.9 billion dollars in the US only. This does not include the product that is lost. This only includes lost dollars in wage and productivity, medical expenses,administrative expenses,employers uninsured cost,motor vehicle, and fire loss's. These do not include product and warehouse damages which I'm sure would add much more to the final number. A small incident in the warehouse goes a long way further then just that, there are administrative,missed orders and a whole line of issues that will cost your company in the end. ( some data gathered from the National Safety Council report 2011)

Posted 3 Feb 2017 05:41 AM Reply  Report this message
EasiTek
Ontario, Canada

After 10 years of working in distribution centers, I've witnessed first hand the extensive damage to racking. Corners get pounded over and over until the whole rack gets unstable. Many trucks were scrapped after repeated collisions, bending and twisting frames, or metal supports cracking. Most injuries were from ride on pallet trucks. saw a few people crush their ankles, hands or fingers. I know 2 driver's who are disabled for life from a transport driver suddenly pulling away from dock while they were unloading trailer. Counterbalanced truck drove straight out the open trailer onto the ground. Both drivers had permanent brain damage.
To cut damage costs, some customers are installing AVG's. Robotic forklift with no driver, no collisions, no sick time, no smoke breaks.
No job for a driver either!

Posted 6 Feb 2017 00:55 AM Reply  Report this message
TerryW
Florida, United States
The following excerpts are from a magazine article I read many years ago but the financial thinking still applies today.  Keeping people safe, reducing accidents, reducing damage, reducing downtime, reducing accidents obviously will save any company money. You will not get any argument from management, unions or employees about this.   However, additional investments in safety must be justified like any investment that a company makes be it production machinery, facility improvements, material handling equipment, office equipment, etc. So safety managers must win support for the financial investment in a safety program and must provide management tangible proof of the economic gains the company accrues when it invests in safety equipment and programs.    This can be done with very simple formulas. These are probably the same formulas that we use in our company today to assist our customers with figures that will be suitable to present to their board for decision. Click here for our formula. I hope this helps.
TerryW


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Creating a culture of safety

Modified 13 Feb 2017 10:31 PM
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ratman
North Carolina, United States
one thing to also keep in mind with the thought of PIT accidents now versus 1992.  today’s AC powered lift trucks are significantly faster as well.   I am sure that speed is a big factor in PIT accidents.  I mean really 12 MPH in a reach truck...Are you nuts?

Posted 23 Feb 2017 11:07 PM Reply  Report this message
chauhan
Utter Pradesh, India

yes.  Speed is major factor for accidents . Operator  must always be checked & warn for over speeding .
Ramesh Chauhan

There is another message for using forklift on road for longer distance,( from storage yard  to work place ) better load with 50 % of rated capacity on fork & with proper locking .
Old Counter weights are more  suitable for this .



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Run forklift on road with 50% of the capacity (LOCKED ) load on fork . (old counter weight) .

Modified 4 May 2017 07:00 PM
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grant_l
Illinois, United States
The latest edition of the National Safety Council, Injury Facts details injuries, fatalities along with all the costs associated with these. This publication is offered to all Members of the council and is available at NSC.org

Modified 22 Apr 2017 01:03 PM
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amy_a
United Kingdom
In our experience at Mentor FLT Training, these costs are difficult to quantify as they vary so much from case to case. For example, even the cost of a simple dropped pallet can vary greatly depending on the load in question – the stock value written off, replacement costs, the clean-up involved and associated down time will be significantly different depending on the contents (luxury, liquid, hazardous etc).

But what we do know is that these costs can be significantly reduced and the best way to do so is to ensure your operators (and those managing them) have the relevant skills and knowledge to work safely and efficiently.

Our MD has put together some articles on the subject containing various facts and figures which may be of interest, including:
http://flickread.com/edition/html/index.php?pdf=58ff6860f1287#48
http://flickread.com/edition/html/index.php?pdf=585915fcac54e#48

Posted 3 May 2017 09:34 PM Reply  Report this message
Hunter
Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
I agree with amy a particularly the bracketed words "and those managing them." Only together can benefits be maximized. Forklift operators need a leader rather than a boss. Somehow a forklift's potential for carnage has been trivialized in many companies.


Posted 3 May 2017 09:46 PM Reply  Report this message
graham_h
Fife, United Kingdom
Amy I was chatting to Stuart today at the Scotland Works exhibition and he suggested I get in touch with yourself. Is there a way I can email you some information about a product proposal for you to consider?

-------------------------
Follow me on Twitter @goodtogosafety

Posted 4 May 2017 00:35 AM Reply  Report this message
amy_a
United Kingdom
Hi Graham, no problem - you should now have a LinkedIn request from me if you would like to send something through

Posted 4 May 2017 00:43 AM Reply  Report this message
graham_h
Fife, United Kingdom
Perfect (great minds think alike) - you probably received an invite from me at the same time you sent me one lol. Will email you shortly. Thanks.

Posted 4 May 2017 00:44 AM Reply  Report this message
dan_m
Ontario, Canada
Hunter

And they should get rid of many of these in-house trainers that do not even know forklifts themselves because they were trained by so-called trainers that don't know forklifts either.  The blind leading the blind.

Do not understand that anybody can be a trainer.  Maybe anybody can take a 1 day course and become a fighter pilot.  You have to know what you are doing and many of these in-house trainers don't know.  Not saying all, but many.

But at least the company saves a few hundred dollars by not having to bring us in every so often.  What one saves in one hand quickly comes out the other

Posted 4 May 2017 01:19 AM Reply  Report this message
Hunter
Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam
You are right dan m but there will always be those that are unable to equate employee investment with profit. When I was an active trainer, I was often told by potential customers there was no way they were going to pay that much to train an employee considering the employee already could operate the forklift. Some managers equate the ability to put a machine in motion to operator competence. The figures in some of the posts in this forum could be used to "train" some managers.

Posted 4 May 2017 09:39 AM Reply  Report this message
dan_m
Ontario, Canada
Always wondered if there are any statistics detailing # of incidents, injuries and deaths in the workplace by those who were trained by a professional trainer vs. those who have been trained by an in-house trainer.

I am tired of these one day train the trainer scammers, and some outfits that all they do is train the trainer, believing that TTT is the answer.  Make a quick buck and who cares.

Shouldn't be in the business, IMHO

Posted 4 May 2017 09:46 AM Reply  Report this message


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